Speed and Strength Summer Camp for Youth!

This 5-day Youth Athletic Development Program provides an opportunity for your child to cultivate and strengthen physical skills in a fun cross training environment with focus on mobility, agility, core strength training, and conditioning games.  Results driven.  By the end of the week, your child will walk away knowing safe lifting techniques for strength training and exercising speed training techniques to maximize power.
Small Groups!  Maximum of 10 participants in each session allows for individualized attention.  Open to boys and girls entering grades 6-12.Geared for all skill levels novice to competitive athlete.
Cost:  $160.00 per session. (Early Registration- Save $10.00 if you regsiter before May 1,2013!)
(Maxout Performance Fitness T-shirt included)
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Session 1:  June 24-28, 2013, 10:00am -12:00pm –entering grades 6-8  
Peers Park  1899 Park Boulevard  Palo Alto  94306
Session 2:  July  8-12, 2013, 10:00am -12:00pm –   entering grades 9-12       
Peers Park  1899 Park Boulevard  Palo Alto  94306
 
Session 3 :  July 15-19, 2013, 12:00 – 2:00pm   –entering grades 6-12 
The Fitness Edge  328 Los Gatos-Saratoga Road  Los Gatos 95030

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About the Coach:  Sergio Maldonado, Strength and Fitness Coach, who specializes in training Youth Sports Performance is a lifelong resident of the Bay Area with a degree in Business/Kinesiology. He holds numerous certifications in the areas of Personal Training and Fitness (IYCA).  He currently trains clients from the age of 11 – 72  in two area training facilities as well as privately in homes.  He has a passion for sports, health, and the 49ers.
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My first client Brandon

I have been working with Brandon since June 2007. I started working at the YMCA in January 2007, I told my boss that I wanted to progress to be a personal trainer. After earning my certification  I met my first client Brandon.

At the time he was a 200lb+ 13 year old. His grandma brought him in to meet with a trainer to discuss his goals and plan for training. In the summer we started an aggressive program that also had to be fun  for a 13 year old. We trained 4-5 days a week including strength training, metabolic conditioning and mobility. We made some great progress then hit a roadblock at about -10lbs of fat-loss.

So we started working on nutrition, eat this, not that.  After some ups and downs we BOTH understood how crucial eating right was to Brandon’s goals. Then after working at the YMCA for 3+ years it was time for me to move on. I transferred Brandon over to another trainer but not before building a great friendship with Brandon as well as his family.

Fast forward about a year and a half later. Brandon’s grandma gives me a call and asks “can you still train Brandon?” I let her know my training schedule at the time and we worked a deal out where I would train Brandon at a nearby park 2-3 times per week since the facilities I worked at were too far for Brandon to get too.

He came to me at his heaviest weight of 269lbs in August 2011. We set some initial exercise goals to get him started and he started keeping a food log. We measured body-fat by taking circumference measurements which were as follows:

9/25/11
Waist 53”
Thigh 26.9”
Calf 18.5”
Forearm 16.5”
Body Fat 54%

This was a huge wake-up call for Brandon. I helped him develop some reasonable goals and decided losing 1% of body fat every 2-3 weeks would be great and also require some hard work. I gave Brandon some resources and strategies on how to start getting his nutrition in line to support fat-loss as well as muscle gain during our sessions. In a nutshell (more protein, more veggies, less carbs and more water/sleep).

As the months passed here was the progress:

9/25/11 10/15/11 11/10/11 11/29/11 2/2/12 3/5/12
Waist 53” 52” 51.33” 51.0” 46.0” 42.5”
Arm 16.5” 16.0” 14.25”
Buttocks 52.25” 51.25” 48.0” 46.5”
Forearm 12.0” 12.0” 12.0” 11.75” 11.75”
Body Fat 54% 52.08% 51.6% 50.77% 45.57% 39.09%
Weight 269 lbs 218 lbs* 215.5 lbs

* Under 220 lb milestone achieved!

4/2/12 5/1/12 8/8/12 9/5/12 10/7/12
Waist 43.5” 43.25” 40.5” 40.5” 39.5”***
Arm 14.25” 14.5” 13.25”
Buttocks 46.0” 46” 45” 43” 43.5”
Forearm 11.75” 11.75” 11.75” 12” went up? Muscle!! 12”
Body Fat 36.23% 33.13% 29.53% 27.45% 25.51%
Weight 213 lbs 207.8 lbs 197 lbs** 189 lbs

** Under 200 lb milestone achieved!

*** Under 40” waist milestone achieved!

          



          

Wow, in a little over a year Brandon lost more than half his body-fat and 80 lbs! Incredible. What’s more incredible is the change in his attitude. He has matured so much in the past year. When I asked Brandon what his big motivator was he tells me ” I was just tired of losing, I wanted to start winning at something.” That’s exactly what he did. It definitely did not all come off immediately as you can see by the numbers. There were speed bumps but once we figured those out we saw some nice gains! We can all relate to Brandon in that way, where failing at things really hurts sometimes. However, when  you can figure out what went wrong and push-through the reward is more than worth it!

That’s one of the MAIN reasons I love working in the field, I physically see the results of hard work and get a firsthand glimpse at the potential we ALL have in ANY aspect of our lives. Fitness to me gives you a fast way, yes I said fast way, of seeing what hard work, planning and even failing can do us. Since it’s all about what we do after we fail, failing to me is not a bad word. It’s GOOD if we can use it to our advantage.

Brandon is my hero and a huge pain in the a$$ sometimes but his will power under duress and continual progress as a trainee as well as a person is inspiring.  He still trains with me twice a week and attends a weight lifting class in college. With all his accomplishments and experiences I believe he could write a book on fat-loss strategies. Today he sent me a text message and asked if it would be better for him to eat a handful of carrots or dark leafy vegetables.  This is the kind of thing he thinks about now. Love it!

You Only Get ONE Body

Age 60 swimming from Alcatraz Island to Fisherman’s Wharf while handcuffed, and pulling a 1,000-pound boat!

Jack LaLanne was famous for saying:  “The only way to hurt the body is don’t use it.”

 

One question I frequently get asked is, “Sergio, how do you stay motivated to work out?”  I usually answer with, “To me, working out is fun and I always have some sort of goal I’m chasing.”

 Many people find themselves in a cycle. At first, they’re super motivated then find themselves burned out in a week or two.  When I aske what their goals were, 99.9% of them say that it’s fat loss. They then continue on to say,  “But I can’t seem to find the time to workout. What’s the fastest and easiest way to do this?”  The answer to this question is in the four steps listed at the bottom.
I began to dig a little deeper into my motivation for training and began asking some of my more successful clients a few questions.
 1. Why do you workout?      2. Why are you able to stick to it?”
What I found out is that there is always a deeper reason that these “special clients” have. This deeper reason is what sets them apart from everyone else trying to lose weight. One example is Brandon who said he wanted to stop being judge by others simply because his weight. This reason will struck some deep emotions with him and when you felt things were tough he would remember his reason. Once these people find a reason I have  seen them set on a path where working out as well as proper nutrition is a priority in their lives.
 Brandon, puts it best when he said he uses a balance between
 “Rewards and Scare Tactics” to keep him motivated.
When thinking about my own motivations and those of my most successful clients, I have to say the two principles Brandon mentioned using positive (Rewards) and negative (Scare Tactics) reinforcement really helps when used in a systematic fashion.  For myself, I use events (triathlons, sports, certifications, challenges..) as rewards because of the feeling of accomplishment I get rewarded with. The “scare tactics” for me is knowledge of nutrition and health. When I see how some foods can really damage our bodies and well as keep us from functioning at not just an optimal level but at a baseline level.  I don’t just try to eat well to be “super healthy”.  I try to eat well to not be sick!  Obesity is a disease that puts you at high risk for many other physical and mental disorders.. I see being overweight or even having an improper diet as being SICK.  I only get ONE BODY and I am trying to maximize what I can do with it. Since I know this will also help maximize my mind, body, and life!
Below is a great post by Mike Boyle, one of the foremost experts in the fields of Strength & Conditioning and Performance Enhancement, which inspired this post.
Take Brandon’s advice of incorporating “Rewards and Scare Tactics” if you want to start training and eating right. I believe that before you start ANY weight-loss system or approach regardless of the actual diet or exercise these are the most important steps to setting yourself up for SUCCESS!
Step 1Find your “it”. What motivates you?  Be honest with yourself and look deep, what is the real reason you want to lose weight?  Spend some time thinking about this, it will be worth it. Write down why you want to lose weight and find feelings associated with that.  Then, turn this into a goal with a timeline. DO IT!
Step 2Set your motivators, REWARDS (positive) and SCARE TACTICS (negative). What will you give yourself once you accomplish your goal?  Set milestone rewards and think of how you will feel. Remember to constantly have small rewards for the tough times.
Scare tactics: Proactively inform yourself with knowledge about health and nutrition. What is that SNICKERS going to do to you? There is a reason kids get super cranky after eating sugar. What are the long-term effects? Find what “scares you” and have something to lose. Tell everyone about goal, nothing scares you into doing something like public commitment. I’m sure there is more than that in which you can think of.
Step 3Execution: make a plan, how long do you have?  Do you want fast progress that may not be able to be maintained as easily or slower but more long lasting change?
 Change is hard or else you would have done it already but if you set a plan and have Step 1 and 2 covered then you can do it!
Step 4Reevaluate: if you have been trying something and it hasn’t worked then try something new. Whether it’s your diet strategy or exercise regimen. Find an approach that works, milk it dry then see what you can tweak.
As always contact me with any questions, comments, angry letters or  funny stories. Thanks!

Sergio Maldonado

MaxOutPerformance Fitness

smaldonado@axispt.com

650.271.7171

“What is the single best thing you can do for your health?”

Great video that my brother sent me, can you guess what it is?

 

2011 Fat Loss Programming

Hello! Long time, not post. I have been busy and here to share some of what I have learned the last few months. I attended the Russian Kettlebell certification in San Diego (and passed!) and the Perform Better Summit in August. Lots of good review and some new info!

I will post my notes here from time to time. Any questions please ask! Some of my notes are not easily comprehensible but I hope you get the picture.

We will start with Alwyn Cosgrove 2011 Fat Loss Programming. I can cite all the research, just ask! If you don’t want to read the whole  thing then at least read the BOLD!

2011 Alwyn Cosgrove Fat loss Programming

1990- $33billion was spend on weight loss in 2009 55 billion!

2009 Study by the CDC Obesity in the US had a direct and indirect cost of 147billion annually. Based on 2006 figures

Energy expenditure: 10% dietary induced (themogenic effect) 20-30% activity induced (all activity) 60-70& Resting metabolic rate. So a big piece is raising metabolism.

The Hierarchy of Fat Loss

1. Correct Nutrition

There’s pretty much nothing that can be done to out-train a crappy diet. You quite simply have to create a caloric deficit while eating enough protein and essential fats. There’s no way around this.

2. See #1

Yep. It really is that important. Several trainers have espoused that the only difference between training for muscle gain and training for fat loss is your diet. I think that’s a massive oversimplification, but it does reinforce how important and effective correct nutrition is toward your ultimate goal.

3. Metabolic Resistance Training and Strength training

Basically we’re using resistance training as the cornerstone of our fat loss programming. Our goal is to work every muscle group hard, frequently, and with an intensity that creates a massive “metabolic disturbance” or “afterburn” that leaves the metabolism elevated for several hours post-workout.

A couple of studies to support this:

Schuenke MD, Mikat RP, McBride JM.

Effect of an acute period of resistance exercise on excess post-exercise oxygen consumption: implications for body mass management.
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2002 Mar;86(5):411-7. Epub 2002 Jan 29.

This study used a circuit training protocol of 12 sets in 31 minutes. EPOC was elevated significantly for 38 hours post-workout.

Thirty-eight hours is a pretty significant timeframe for metabolism to be elevated. If you trained at 9AM until 10AM on Monday morning, you’re still burning more calories (without training) at midnight on Tuesday.

Can we compound this with additional training within that 38 hours? No research has been done, but I have enough case studies to believe that you can.

Another:

Kramer, Volek et al.

Influence of exercise training on physiological and performance changes with weight loss in men.

Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 31, No. 9, pp. 1320-1329, 1999.

Overweight subjects were assigned to three groups: diet-only, diet plus aerobics, diet plus aerobics plus weights. The diet group lost 14.6 pounds of fat in 12 weeks. The aerobic group lost only one more pound (15.6 pounds) than the diet group (training was three times a week starting at 30 minutes and progressing to 50 minutes over the 12 weeks).

The weight training group lost 21.1 pounds of fat (44% and 35% more than diet and aerobic only groups respectively). Basically, the addition of aerobic training didn’t result in any real world significant fat loss over dieting alone.

Thirty-six sessions of up to 50 minutes is a lot of work for one additional pound of fat loss. However, the addition of resistance training greatly accelerated fat loss results.

One more:

Bryner RW, Ullrich IH, Sauers J, Donley D, Hornsby G, Kolar M, Yeater R.

Effects of resistance vs. aerobic training combined with an 800 calorie liquid diet on lean body mass and resting metabolic rate.
J Am Coll Nutr. 1999 Apr;18(2):115-21.

The aerobic group performed four hours of aerobics per week. The resistance training group performed 2-4 sets of 8-15 reps, 10 exercises, three times per week.

V02 max increased equally in both groups. Both groups lost weight. The resistance training group lost significantly more fat and didn’t lose any LBM, even at only 800 calories per day. (The reason the calories were so low was to really take any dietary variables completely out of the equation and compare the effects of the exercise regime on LBM and metabolism.)

The resistance training group actually increased metabolism compared to the aerobic group, which decreased metabolism. It seems that resistance training is a more significant stress to the body than a starvation diet.

In my experience, full body training in a superset, tri-set, or circuit format (with non-competing exercises) in a rep range that generates lactic acid (and pushes the lactic acid threshold or LAT) seems to create the biggest metabolic demand. It makes sense: training legs, back, and chest will burn more calories and elevate metabolism more than an isolated approach training one of them.

The rep range that seems to work best is the 8-12 hypertrophy range, although going higher will work just as well with a less trained population.

For a powerlifter or an advanced bodybuilder, doing one max effort exercise or heavy, low-rep lift is more than enough to maintain your current strength levels. Examples:

Powerlifter

Exercise One: Max Effort Squat — work up to a 3RM. Transitioning into metabolic work.

Bodybuilder

Exercise Sequence:

1A: Bench press, 2-3 sets of 4-6 reps

1B: Row, 2-3 sets of 4-6 reps
Transitioning into metabolic work

2. High Intensity Anaerobic Interval Training

The second key “ingredient” in fat loss programming is high intensity interval training (HIIT). I think readers of T-Nation will be well aware of the benefits of interval work. It burns more calories than steady state and elevates metabolism significantly more than other forms of cardio. The downside is that it flat-out sucks to do it!

The landmark study in interval training was from Tremblay:

Tremblay A, Simoneau JA, Bouchard C.

Impact of exercise intensity on body fatness and skeletal muscle metabolism.
Metabolism. 1994 Jul;43(7):814-8

This study pitted 20 weeks of endurance training against 15 weeks of interval training:

Energy cost of endurance training = 28661 calories.
Energy cost of interval training = 13614 calories (less than half)

The interval training group showed a nine times greater loss in subcutaneous fat than the endurance group (when corrected for energy cost).

Read that again. Calorie for calorie, the interval training group lost nine times more fat overall. Why? Maybe it’s EPOC, an up-regulation of fat burning enzyme activity, or straight up G-Flux. I don’t care. I’m a real world guy. If the interval training group had lost the same fat as the endurance group, we’d get the same results in less time. That means interval training is a better tool in your fat loss arsenal.
3. High Intensity Aerobic Interval Training

The next tool we’ll pull out is essentially a lower intensity interval method where we use aerobic intervals.

Talanian, Galloway et al

Two weeks of High-Intensity Aerobic Interval Training increases the capacity for fat oxidation during exercise in women.
J Appl Physiol (December 14, 2006). doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.01098.2006

This study looked at high-intensity aerobic interval training and its influence on fat oxidation. In summary, seven sessions of HIIT over two weeks induced marked increases in whole body and skeletal muscle capacity for fatty acid oxidation during exercise in moderately active women. In layman’s terms, the interval work appeared to “up regulate” fat burning enzymes.

Basically this means we can burn more fat in other activities as a result of this inclusion. In other words, we get some more bang for our buck.

A quick disclaimer though: my colleague Alan Aragon once said, “Caring about how much fat is burned during exercise is equivalent to worrying about how much muscle is built during exercise.” In other words, substrate utilization during exercise isn’t really an important variable in the big picture of fat loss — total calories burned overall is.

4. Steady State High Intensity Aerobic Training

Tool number four is just hard cardio work. This time we’re burning calories — we aren’t working hard enough to increase EPOC significantly or to do anything beyond the session itself. But calories do count. Burning another 300 or so calories per day will add up.

5. Steady State Low Intensity Aerobic Training

This is just activity, going for a walk in the park, etc. It won’t burn a lot of calories; it won’t increase muscle or EPOC.

There isn’t very much research showing that low intensity aerobic training actually results in very much additional fat loss, but you’re going to have to really work to convince me that moving more is going to hurt you when you’re in fat attack mode.

Studies to site for proof of hierarchy:

1.      Marathon of the sands study (gained body fat by running marathons)

2.      Various aerobic studies (not effective for fat loss)

3.      Interval vs steady studies (Cal per Cal interval = more fat loss than steady )

4.      Diet vs diet plus aerobic vs diet plus resistance (resistance wins, 44% more effective)

5.      Explosive exercise burns 13% more than slow training and 7% more post training

6.      Supersets create more afterburn compared to traditional lifting

7.      KB swing study- swings for 12mins have a avg HR 87% MAX

8.      Snatch 15 on 15 off for 20mins burned 20.2 Cals per minute!

9.      Wrong measurement for anaerobic Cal expenditure? Used a anaerobic measurement for lifting and found the caloric difference that was not making sense.

Future of Fat Loss is:

FMS- Functional Movement Screen: use it to screen to fix any dysfunction so you can get to training and not get hurt because of it. In some cases will release muscle to work optimally therefore ramping up metabolism.

Self-Limiting exercises: get-up, barefoot training, TRX rows

For the metabolic workouts and strength workouts use: supersets, self-limiting exercises, explosive, kb swings, sand bags and ropes.

Summary:

Create a maximal metabolic disturbance characterized by:

Heavy resistance, time under tension approaching 60’s, short rest periods, supersets of mini-circuits to maximize work density.

AND AGAIN, you can’t out train incorrect nutrition.

What is the fastest way? Include explosive exercises and have a bias to self limiting exercises in:

-two metabolic sessions

-two strength sessions

Fat Loss, athletic longevity and seniors Think about it!

From Cosgrove’s blog, great topics to ponder.
June 6th, 2011

Some random stuff off the top of my head (and sometimes the bottom of my heart!):

===

The part that most trainers miss as regards training (that I’ve always felt) is that Olympic lifting and powerlifting are designed to move as much weight as efficiently as possible (ie as little “work” as possible ). Competitive kettlebell lifting is the same – make the movement as efficient (and therefore as least demanding) as possible.

Bodybuilding is about creating as much tension and overload on a single muscle as possible, regardless of load (ie make everything feel “heavy”). That’s the reason machines were invented – to isolate and overload muscles.

Cardio training is about becoming as efficient as possible in a usually cyclical repeated movement so that it becomes easier and easier over time.

General fitness and metabolic training for fat loss might be about creating as much IN-efficiency as possible – creating as much systemic stress overall as possible with as little localized joint stress or repetition as possible. So the body can never habituate, and there is no risk of overuse injury.

So why did we copy lifting sports, bodybuilding and endurance sports when we wanted to train general fitness athletes? We can’t just copy other modalities when we want a completely different outcome.

===

Bernard Hopkins just won the World light-heavyweight championship at 46 years old beating Jean Pascal – a 29 year old once-beaten fighter.
Contrast that with David Reid – a former World Champion boxer who won Olympic Gold, and the World Championship in his 11th pro fight, but who’s career was over by the time he was 28. Joe Calzaghe retired undefeated at 37. Fernando Vargas was finished at 29.
What’s the difference?

Or in other sports, David Beckham who at 36 is way into the latter part of his career and seemed to go from one of the best in the World to average in record time. With millions of pounds at different team’s disposal for trainers, nutritionists, therapists – why the decline?
Staying with football – Ronaldo, widely considered to be one of the best of all time – World Cup winner, Golden Boot winner… retired at 34.

Tom Watson just won the Senior PGA championship at age 61.

And why is Hopkins getting better at a far more physically demanding sport than football or golf, at a much older age?

We spend so much time studying athletic development. More fascinating to me is athletic longevity. With all of our knowledge on sports science, nutrition and training – why do some athletes have longer careers than others? What are we missing?

If we could extend an athlete’s career at the top level just one year, by knowing what the difference makers are, that could be worth millions of dollars….

===

Speaking of longevity – we’ve been wrong about training seniors. We started with cardio because the heart is important — and they lost muscle mass and function. Then we embraced strength training to maintain muscle and got closer…. now finally we’re understanding that seniors need explosive power training… we lose power long before we lose muscle mass or cardio conditioning, and it’s been shown that power training maintains muscle and improves balance and co-ordination.

Maybe the only reason muscle sticks around is because the body senses the need for it to produce power. Power training tells the body it needs the muscle to stick around – and moving fast tells the body to shift the excess baggage (bodyfat)….

Maybe we’ve been thinking about the whole thing backwards….


AC

The Greatest Ab Exercise

When people know that I am a trainer, I get this one a lot “what is the best ab exercise?” Usually, I try to dig further into the why’s of the rationale for asking the questions and point them to diet/strength training etc such as a previous post http://wp.me/pKLG7-bP

I did come across a post by respected Strength Coach/Trainer Nick Tumminello who first of all has research to back the “this is the best ab exercise” claim.  Then 2nd it is a great exercise combination that falls great in a plank to roll-out progression.  Check out the exercise if you have a experience working with stability balls and ab wheels. Let me know what you think and as always please feel free to contact me with questions or concerns.

Sergio

Fitness and Sports Performance Coach

sergiom_personaltrainer@yahoo.com

Hierarchy Of Fat Loss

Below is a re-post of a blog post I did last year and below that is the expanded version with research citations from the original presenter.

Enclosed is a re-post of a blog entry that I did last year.  Below it is the expanded version including research citations from the original presenter.

I also wanted to address traditional “cardio” vs. intervals and/or strength training. The post below depicts WHY for  the primary goal of FAT LOSS, traditional cardio (long bouts of steady state work) is basically a misuse of your time. In addition, I know that if STRENGTH is your primary goal then long bouts of steady state work will contradict this goal as well because it is on the complete opposite side of the spectrum in terms of muscle fiber type, energy systems and specificity. Basically, you ruin your strength training.

However, if you goal is to compete in an endurance event or you just plain LOVE running, biking, swimming long distances then it can have a place. You just have to use it wisely and train for it accordingly.  This means, you should  get strong enough for those activities, whether it be resistance training or sprinting.    This means you must watch the volume of your training and really LISTEN to your body. IF something hurts   STOP DOING IT, do not just ignore it and chalk it up to “no pain, no gain” or “I’m just getting old.”    That’s like having a check engine light on in your car and  covering it up with a shirt so you can’t see it, or worse,  having a flat and continuing to drive on it.
Big takeaways:

1) Know what your goal is.     Fat loss, building strength, endurance performance, sports performance are ALL very different goals. There is some crossover but you need to know WHAT you are training for.

2) Do the highest return activities that will get you to your goals.

3) listen to YOUR body .   If what you are doing is not working then something needs to change. Do not do the same thing and expect different results.  Remember Einstein… the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results!  (I’d double check that to make sure it’s right!)

SM

Sergiom_personaltrainer@yahoo.com

Re-post:

“Get ripped, lean out”, “lose fat”,  “keep my butt from sagging”…. This is what  I hear everyday when I ask people what their goals are with their fitness regime.   I just watched a DVD  of a seminar I attended last year by a very well respected fitness professional named Alwyn Cosgrove.  The seminar had some great guidelines  for fat-loss which were all PRACTICAL and RESEARCH based. Research based fitness regimes are important, if you follow them closely it is highly likely that  IT WORKS.

We will start with the Hierarchy of Fat-Loss from the most important to the least:

1) Nutrition

2) See #1, yes it’s that important

3) Activities that promote lean body mass, burn calories and raise metabolism

4) Activities that raise metabolism and burn calories

5) Activities that burn calories

Now we understand Nutrition is KEY and if you expect a change in body composition you need to tweak your nutritional habits. (more on this later).

As for the activities here is what number  3, 4 and 5 correspond to in real life:

1) Strength training and metabolic acceleration training (MET). The first part is a progressive strength training routine which promotes lean body mass. Also, in the case that  you are in a caloric deficit ,you can keep or gain muscle with strength training . The second part is called MET, which is what I typically call metabolic conditioning, this includes timed sets, circuits, countdowns, tabatas and “cardio strength” mixed in with intervals. This type of work can elevate your metabolism for up to 36 hours afterwords!

2) Anaerobic intervals, these are intervals done at a pace that leaves you breathing hard by the end of the set above 85% max HR

3) Aerobic Intervals, intervals in a zone where you are left aware of your breathing under 85% HR

4) Aerobic conditioning, includes long distance pace work

If you have:

1-3 hours a week use #1

3-5 hours use 1 and 2

6 plus hours add in 3 and 4

Here is a Nutrition Checklist as summarized by the seminar:

1) Eat a big breakfast

2) Eat at regular intervals throughout the day

3) eat 3-5 meals a day

4) reduce the amount of refined carbs in the diet, basically go low-carb, eat most of your carbohydrates in the form of vegetables, Eat a LOT of VEGGIES!

5) Supplement with Fish Oil as well as protein if you are not eating protein at every meal

6) balance your Glycemic Load, in other words eat carbs, protein and fat during EVERY meal

7) drink tons of water, (a good rule of thumb is to drink 1/2 body-weight in ounces)

All the recommendations above are  backed by research and applied to everyday gym goers, and it works!  (If you want to borrow the DVD let me know!)

Note that strength training has to be progressive and challenging. Just lifting a weight WILL NOT get it done. Become technically sound at a lift then overload it and lift heavy! Also note that the MET type of training should be activities that you are proficient at and can use to get a cardio response as well as strength training. I post videos and articles on this freqently since this is the hardest to “get.”

The bottom line is that you need  to plan what you will eat for the week.

Use these nutriton tips, strength train hard and get in some MET and enjoy the results!

If you have any questions or comments do not hesitate to contact me

Happy training

SM

Sergiom_personaltrainer@yahoo.com

Hierarchy Of Fat Loss

January 26th, 2010

The Hierarchy of Fat Loss
by Alwyn Cosgrove

Time for Fat Loss

“Fat loss is an all-out war. Give it 28 days — only 28 days. Attack it with all you have. It’s not a lifestyle choice; it’s a battle. Lose fat and then get back into moderation. There’s another one for you: moderation. Revelation says it best: ‘You are lukewarm and I shall spit you out.’ Moderation is for sissies.”

— Dan John, legend

I’ve been training people for a long time. I own a gym that has several trainers training several people. Despite all the athletes we’ve worked with over the years, by far the single biggest client request has been fat loss.

I’ve made more money from the fat loss market than any other single client group. Over the years my methods have evolved and been refined by what I see in the gym. Simply put, if I can get 20 pounds of fat off a client faster than my competition, I have a higher demand for my services.

I’ve written several articles on fat loss and answered countless questions on the topic. One of the questions I get a lot is:

“I’m <insert something here> and I’m trying to lose fat. How can I do that without <insert losing strength/speed/muscle here.>”

Basically, powerlifters want to keep powerlifting, mixed martial artists want to keep fighting, and recreational bodybuilders want to maintain their muscle mass, all while losing fat. Their massive fear of negatively impacting their athletic performance by not focusing on it for a short time is largely unfounded.

I think whenever we try to pursue two goals at once we tend to compromise results. This is usually because we have a limited resource: time. If our goal is to generate fat loss, then using a periodized training approach with a specific fat loss phase (e.g. four weeks, eight weeks, etc.) where we focus exclusively on fat loss will always yield better results in the long term than trying to juggle two goals at once.

For example, a powerlifter trying to drop a weight class or lean out will be better served by not powerlifting for a period of time. By focusing on getting lean and then going back to powerlifting training, he won’t fall into the downward spiral of trying to maintain his lifts and get lean at the same time. A 16 week program that includes 8 weeks of hardcore fat loss training, followed by 8 weeks of powerlifting work, will likely yield better results than 16 weeks of trying to do both simultaneously.

With our regular clients or with ourselves, we’re usually extremely limited with time. Most of us can only train three to four times per week. With that in mind — with time being our limiting factor — how do we maximize fat loss? Is there a hierarchy of fat loss techniques? I think so.

Before I get into it, I want to share with you something Mike Boyle said when he did a staff training at my facility a couple of months ago:

“The information presented is my opinion based on over 25 years of coaching experience, communication with several professionals in my field, and an incessant desire to better myself and improve the rate and magnitude of my clients’ results. I’m not here to argue my opinion versus your opinion. Please ask questions. I’ll explain my views but am unlikely to change them.”

I don’t have 25 years of experience (only 17), but I feel pretty much the same. Here are my thoughts.

The Hierarchy of Fat Loss

1. Correct Nutrition

There’s pretty much nothing that can be done to out-train a crappy diet. You quite simply have to create a caloric deficit while eating enough protein and essential fats. There’s no way around this.

2. See #1

Yep. It really is that important. Several trainers have espoused that the only difference between training for muscle gain and training for fat loss is your diet. I think that’s a massive oversimplification, but it does reinforce how important and effective correct nutrition is toward your ultimate goal.

3. Activities that burn calories, maintain/promote muscle mass, and elevate metabolism

I think it’s fairly obvious that the bulk of calories burned are determined by our resting metabolic rate or RMR. The amount of calories burned outside of our resting metabolism (through exercise, thermic effect of feeding, etc.) is a smaller contributor to overall calories burned per day.

We can also accept that RMR is largely a function of how much muscle you have on your body — and how hard it works. Therefore, adding activities that promote or maintain muscle mass will make that muscle mass work harder and elevate the metabolic rate. This will become our number one training priority when developing fat loss programs.

4. Activities that burn calories and elevate metabolism

The next level of fat loss programming would be a similar activity. We’re still looking at activities that eat up calories and increase EPOC.

EPOC (Exercise Post Oxygen Consumption) is defined scientifically as the “recovery of metabolic rate back to pre-exercise levels” and “can require several minutes for light exercise and several hours for hard intervals.”

Essentially, we’re looking for activities that keep us burning more calories after the exercise session.

5. Activities that burn calories but don’t necessarily maintain muscle or elevate metabolism

This is the “icing on the cake” — adding in activities that’ll burn up additional calories but don’t necessarily contribute to increasing metabolism. This is the least effective tool in your arsenal as it doesn’t burn much outside of the primary exercise session.

Let’s put this fat loss continuum together in terms of our progressive training hierarchy.

Five Factors for Fat Loss Training

1. Metabolic Resistance Training

Basically we’re using resistance training as the cornerstone of our fat loss programming. Our goal is to work every muscle group hard, frequently, and with an intensity that creates a massive “metabolic disturbance” or “afterburn” that leaves the metabolism elevated for several hours post-workout.

A couple of studies to support this:

Schuenke MD, Mikat RP, McBride JM.

Effect of an acute period of resistance exercise on excess post-exercise oxygen consumption: implications for body mass management.
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2002 Mar;86(5):411-7. Epub 2002 Jan 29.

This study used a circuit training protocol of 12 sets in 31 minutes. EPOC was elevated significantly for 38 hours post-workout.

Thirty-eight hours is a pretty significant timeframe for metabolism to be elevated. If you trained at 9AM until 10AM on Monday morning, you’re still burning more calories (without training) at midnight on Tuesday.

Can we compound this with additional training within that 38 hours? No research has been done, but I have enough case studies to believe that you can.

Another:

Kramer, Volek et al.

Influence of exercise training on physiological and performance changes with weight loss in men.

Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 31, No. 9, pp. 1320-1329, 1999.

Overweight subjects were assigned to three groups: diet-only, diet plus aerobics, diet plus aerobics plus weights. The diet group lost 14.6 pounds of fat in 12 weeks. The aerobic group lost only one more pound (15.6 pounds) than the diet group (training was three times a week starting at 30 minutes and progressing to 50 minutes over the 12 weeks).

The weight training group lost 21.1 pounds of fat (44% and 35% more than diet and aerobic only groups respectively). Basically, the addition of aerobic training didn’t result in any real world significant fat loss over dieting alone.

Thirty-six sessions of up to 50 minutes is a lot of work for one additional pound of fat loss. However, the addition of resistance training greatly accelerated fat loss results.

One more:

Bryner RW, Ullrich IH, Sauers J, Donley D, Hornsby G, Kolar M, Yeater R.

Effects of resistance vs. aerobic training combined with an 800 calorie liquid diet on lean body mass and resting metabolic rate.
J Am Coll Nutr. 1999 Apr;18(2):115-21.

The aerobic group performed four hours of aerobics per week. The resistance training group performed 2-4 sets of 8-15 reps, 10 exercises, three times per week.

V02 max increased equally in both groups. Both groups lost weight. The resistance training group lost significantly more fat and didn’t lose any LBM, even at only 800 calories per day. (The reason the calories were so low was to really take any dietary variables completely out of the equation and compare the effects of the exercise regime on LBM and metabolism.)

The resistance training group actually increased metabolism compared to the aerobic group, which decreased metabolism. It seems that resistance training is a more significant stress to the body than a starvation diet.

In my experience, full body training in a superset, tri-set, or circuit format (with non-competing exercises) in a rep range that generates lactic acid (and pushes the lactic acid threshold or LAT) seems to create the biggest metabolic demand. It makes sense: training legs, back, and chest will burn more calories and elevate metabolism more than an isolated approach training one of them.

The rep range that seems to work best is the 8-12 hypertrophy range, although going higher will work just as well with a less trained population.

For a powerlifter or an advanced bodybuilder, doing one max effort exercise or heavy, low-rep lift is more than enough to maintain your current strength levels. Examples:

Powerlifter

Exercise One: Max Effort Squat — work up to a 3RM. Transitioning into metabolic work.

Bodybuilder

Exercise Sequence:

1A: Bench press, 2-3 sets of 4-6 reps

1B: Row, 2-3 sets of 4-6 reps
Transitioning into metabolic work

2. High Intensity Anaerobic Interval Training

The second key “ingredient” in fat loss programming is high intensity interval training (HIIT). I think readers of T-Nation will be well aware of the benefits of interval work. It burns more calories than steady state and elevates metabolism significantly more than other forms of cardio. The downside is that it flat-out sucks to do it!

The landmark study in interval training was from Tremblay:

Tremblay A, Simoneau JA, Bouchard C.

Impact of exercise intensity on body fatness and skeletal muscle metabolism.
Metabolism. 1994 Jul;43(7):814-8

This study pitted 20 weeks of endurance training against 15 weeks of interval training:

Energy cost of endurance training = 28661 calories.
Energy cost of interval training = 13614 calories (less than half)

The interval training group showed a nine times greater loss in subcutaneous fat than the endurance group (when corrected for energy cost).

Read that again. Calorie for calorie, the interval training group lost nine times more fat overall. Why? Maybe it’s EPOC, an upregulation of fat burning enzyme activity, or straight up G-Flux. I don’t care. I’m a real world guy. If the interval training group had lost the same fat as the endurance group, we’d get the same results in less time. That means interval training is a better tool in your fat loss arsenal.
3. High Intensity Aerobic Interval Training

The next tool we’ll pull out is essentially a lower intensity interval method where we use aerobic intervals.

Talanian, Galloway et al

Two weeks of High-Intensity Aerobic Interval Training increases the capacity for fat oxidation during exercise in women.
J Appl Physiol (December 14, 2006). doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.01098.2006

This study looked at high-intensity aerobic interval training and its influence on fat oxidation. In summary, seven sessions of HIIT over two weeks induced marked increases in whole body and skeletal muscle capacity for fatty acid oxidation during exercise in moderately active women. In layman’s terms, the interval work appeared to “upregulate” fat burning enzymes.

Basically this means we can burn more fat in other activities as a result of this inclusion. In other words, we get some more bang for our buck.

A quick disclaimer though: my colleague Alan Aragon once said, “Caring about how much fat is burned during exercise is equivalent to worrying about how much muscle is built during exercise.” In other words, substrate utilization during exercise isn’t really an important variable in the big picture of fat loss — total calories burned overall is.

4. Steady State High Intensity Aerobic Training

Tool number four is just hard cardio work. This time we’re burning calories — we aren’t working hard enough to increase EPOC significantly or to do anything beyond the session itself. But calories do count. Burning another 300 or so calories per day will add up.

5. Steady State Low Intensity Aerobic Training

This is just activity, going for a walk in the park, etc. It won’t burn a lot of calories; it won’t increase muscle or EPOC.

There isn’t very much research showing that low intensity aerobic training actually results in very much additional fat loss, but you’re going to have to really work to convince me that moving more is going to hurt you when you’re in fat attack mode.

Putting It All Together: Time Management

You’ll notice that this is perhaps the opposite recommendations from what you typically read in the mainstream media. Usually fat loss recommendations start with low intensity aerobics, progress to high intensity aerobics, then intervals. Finally, when you’re “in shape” they recommend resistance training.

My approach to massive fat loss is attacking from the complete opposite of the norm. If you’re a professional bodybuilder, then you typically have extra time to add in cardio and do extra work to get lean. A “real world” client with a job and a family can rarely afford additional time; therefore, we need to look at our training in a more efficient manner and focus on our time available first, then design our programming based on that.

If you have 3 hours per week, use only #1 above: metabolic resistance training

This can be three, one-hour training sessions, or four 45-minute training sessions. It doesn’t seem to matter.

However, once you’re getting three hours per week of total body resistance training, in my experience I haven’t seen an additional effect in terms of fat loss by doing more. My guess is that, at that point, recovery starts to become a concern and intensity is impaired.

This type of training involves barbell complexes, supersets, tri-sets, circuits, EDT work, kettlebell combos, etc.

If you have 3-5 hours, use #1 and # 2: weight training plus high intensity interval work

At this point, any additional work is usually in the form of high intensity interval training. I’m looking to burn up more calories and continue to elevate EPOC.

Interval training is like putting your savings into a high return investment account. Low intensity aerobics is like hiding it under your mattress. Both will work, but the return you get is radically different.

If you have 5-6 hours available, add #3: aerobic interval training

Aerobic intervals wins out at this point because it’s still higher intensity overall than steady state work so it burns more calories. There appears to be a fat oxidation benefit and will still be easier to recover from than additional anaerobic work.

If you have 6-8 hours available, add #4

If you’re not losing a lot of fat with six hours of training already, then I’d be taking a very close look at your diet. If everything is in place, but we just need to ramp up fat loss some more (e.g. for a special event: a photo shoot, high school reunion, etc.) then we’ll add in some hard cardio — a long run or bike ride with heart rate at 75% of max or higher.

Why not do as much of this as possible then? Well, the goal is to burn as many calories as we can without negatively impacting the intensity of our higher priority activities.

If I have more time than that, I’ll add # 5

I think I’m getting into fairytale land at this point. I don’t think most of us have more than eight hours of training time available per week. But if we do, this is when any additional activity will help to burn up calories, which is never a bad thing.

A lot of fighters have used this activity to help make weight. This works because it burns up calories but doesn’t leave you tired for your strength training, sparring, or technical work.

That’s the key with the addition of this activity: just to move, get your body moving, and burn up some additional calories — but not to work so hard that it inhibits recovery and negatively affects our other training.

The research and the real world don’t really show massive changes from the inclusion of this type of activity; however, I think everything has its place. Remember, this is a hierarchy of training, and this is fifth on the list for a reason.

Smart guys call this NEAT — Non Exercise Activity Thermogenesis. I call it moving a wee bit more than normal.
Summary

Keep in mind that all I’ve said here is that harder training works better than easier training. It really is that simple.

To conclude, I agree with coach Dan John. Attack body fat with a passion and a single minded goal. The best way to do this is with an all-out assault implementing the hierarchy I described above.

Summer is almost here. Shirts are coming off whether you’re ready or not. Attack your body fat with a massive action plan for the next eight weeks!

This article originally appeared at t-nation.com
© 1998 — 2007 Testosterone, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

 

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Strength + Nutrition = NEW YOU

How do I lose body-fat?

How do I reduce back pain?

How do I train for _________ sport?

Strength

Whether it’s cosmetic, rehab or performance the best way to train for this is strength training. Most people don’t strength train, some people “lift weights” and very few really strength train. Lifting weights is different from strength training. Strength training means you are constantly improving, just lifting something for a certain number of reps does not get you stronger. Here is an email a colleague of mine gave me below about strength training.

Some reason why you should weight train and some research to go along with it

First, let me say that I have no shame AT ALL!… I am a CERTIFIED PLAGERIZER and proud of it. I got this info off of 4 different websites, copied, paste, and now taking all the credit for it.

Enjoy….

Weight Training Just because you’re not vying for 20-inch biceps or thunderously strong thighs like the muscle heads in the gym doesn’t mean you should shun the weight room. Lifting weights gives you an edge over belly fat, stress, heart disease, and cancer—and it’s also the single most effective way to look hot in a bikini!!!  Yet somehow women and men are still hesitant: Only about a fifth of female’s  and 2 out of every 5 males strength train two or more times a week.

Here are 12 reasons you shouldn’t live another day without hitting the weights:

1. You’ll lose 40 percent more fat.

If you think cardio is the key to blasting belly fat, keep reading: When Penn State researchers put dieters into three groups—no exercise, aerobic exercise only, or aerobic exercise and weight training—they all lost around 21 pounds, but the lifters shed six more pounds of fat than those who didn’t pump iron. Why? The lifters’ loss was almost pure fat; the others lost fat and muscle.

Other research on dieters who don’t lift shows that, on average, 75 percent of their weight loss is from fat, while 25 percent is from muscle. Muscle loss may drop your scale weight, but it doesn’t improve your reflection in the mirror and it makes you more likely to gain back the flab you lost. However, if you weight train as you diet, you’ll protect your hard-earned muscle and burn more fat.

2. Your clothes will fit better.

Research shows that between the ages of 30 and 50, you’ll likely lose 10 percent of your body’s total muscle. Worse yet, it’s likely to be replaced by fat over time, says a study. And that increases your waist size, because one pound of fat takes up 18 percent more space than one pound of muscle.

3. You’ll burn more calories.

Lifting increases the number of calories you burn while your butt is parked on the couch. That’s because after each strength workout, your muscles need energy to repair their fibers. In fact, researchers found that when people did a total-body workout with just three big-muscle moves, their metabolisms were raised for 39 hours afterward. They also burned a greater percentage of calories from fat compared with those who didn’t lift.

Lifting gives you a better burn during exercise too: Doing a circuit of eight moves (which takes about eight minutes) can expend 159 to 231 calories. That’s about what you’d burn if you ran at a 10-mile-per-hour pace for the same duration.

4. Your diet will improve.

Exercise helps your brain stick to a diet plan. University of Pittsburgh researchers studied 169 overweight adults and found that those who didn’t follow a three-hours-a-week training regimen ate more than their allotted 1,500 calories a day. The reverse was also true— sneaking snacks sabotaged their workouts. The study authors say both diet and exercise likely remind you to stay on track, aiding your weight-loss goals.

5. You’ll handle stress better.

Break a sweat in the weight room and you’ll stay cool under pressure. Scientists determined that the fittest people exhibited lower levels of stress hormones than those who were the least fit. Another study found that after a stressful situation, the blood pressure levels of people with the most muscle returned to normal faster than the levels of those with the least muscle.

6. You’ll be happier.

Yoga isn’t the only Zen-inducing kind of exercise. Researchers found that people who performed three weight workouts a week for six months significantly improved their scores on measures of anger and overall mood.

7. You’ll build stronger bones.

As you age, bone mass goes to pot, which increases your likelihood of one day suffering a debilitating fracture. The good news: A study found that 16 weeks of resistance training increased hip bone density and elevated blood levels of osteocalcin—a marker of bone growth—by 19 percent.

8. You’ll get into shape faster.

The term cardio shouldn’t describe only aerobic exercise: A study found that circuit training with weights raises your heart rate 15 beats per minute higher than if you ran at 60 to 70 percent of your max heart rate. This approach strengthens muscles and provides cardiovascular benefits similar to those of aerobic exercise— so you save time without sacrificing results.

9. Your heart will be healthier.

Researchers at the University of Michigan found that people who did three total-body weight workouts a week for two months decreased their diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) by an average of eight points. That’s enough to reduce the risk of a stroke by 40 percent and the chance of a heart attack by 15 percent.

10. You’ll be way more productive.

Lifting could result in a raise (or at least a pat on the back from your boss). Researchers found that workers were 15 percent more productive on days they exercised compared with days they didn’t. So on days you work out, you can (theoretically) finish in eight hours what would normally take nine hours and 12 minutes. Or you’d still work for nine hours but get more done, leaving you feeling less stressed and happier with your job—another perk reported on days workers exercised.

11. You’ll live longer.

University of South Carolina researchers determined that total-body strength is linked to lower risks of death from cardiovascular disease and cancer. Similarly, other scientists found that being strong during middle age is associated with “exceptional survival,” defined as living to the age of 85 without developing a major disease.

12. You’ll be even smarter.

Muscles strengthen your body and mind: Brazilian researchers found that six months of resistance training enhanced lifters’ cognitive function. In fact, the sweat sessions resulted in better short- and long-term memory, improved verbal reasoning, and a longer attention span.

Now, here are some research studies to lighten your day up a little…


First one:


Knab et al.
A 45-Minute Vigorous Exercise Bout Increases Metabolic Rate for 14 Hours.
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Feb 8.


These researchers had subjects undergo a bout of cycling at approx 73% of VO2 max (approximately 84% of max heart rate) for 45 mins.

The subjects burned on average 520 calories in the 45 min training session. The following day their resting energy expenditure was increased an average of 190 cals compared to normal. Basically – the subjects burned an additional 37% MORE calories than the workout itself in the 14 hour post workout period — meaning that a single high-intensity session, when including the post-workout metabolic boost could burn up to 710 cals in total.


A second study:


Heden et al.
One-set resistance training elevates energy expenditure for 72 h similar to three sets.
European Journal of Applied Physiology. Volume 111, Number 3, 477-484, Mar 2011


The subjects were put on a very simple resistance training routine – full body training, either 1 or 3 sets per exercise of ten exercises.

The researchers then examined the subjects resting energy expenditure at 24, 48 and 72 hours post workout.  Both groups showed an elevated metabolism (afterburn effect) of around 100 cals per day.

But there was no difference between groups. It seems that it’s intensity that determines how many calories are burned post-workout, not volume (obviously a higher volume program would burn more calories during the session than a lower volume program.


One more:


Astorino et al.
Effect of acute caffeine ingestion on EPOC after intense resistance training.
J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2011 Mar;51(1):11-7.


This study showed a 15% increase in post-workout calories burned after the ingestion of caffeine as a pre-workout supplement. The total extra calories burned as a result of this only added up to around 27 cals in the hour after the workout. Not a lot but still something to consider. Plus I like iced coffee 🙂


If this article doesn’t put a smile on your face, nothing will!

 

Love,

Francisco


Nutrition

Good nutrition is simple, adherence is tough. You just need the basic prinicples and confidence to stick to your plan to execute your nutritonal strategy.

“The goal is to keep the goal the goal”

-Dan John

Here are notes the same collegue emailed me following our seminar with Dr. Clyde

Top 20 Key Notes from Nutritionist Dr Clyde Wilsons Presentation

  1. Controlling metabolism is everything when it comes to health. Key in war against fat loss, poor performance, and vital with promoting overall health.
  2. Anything in excess; animal fats, slow digesting carbs, sugar, and naturally produced Trans fat are bad for you. They should be consumed in moderation to serve as a benefit.
  3. S*%^, water is important, yet drink 5 gallons of it and you’ll dye in minutes!
  4. Breakfast is important; it truly makes a difference of what you eat when striving for optimal health.
  5. However, if you’re not eating breakfast now, just start. Don’t worry about what it is yet. The first step is just to start.
  6. When choosing what to eat in the morning, the difference between Corn Pops, milk, and a banana vs. All Bran, yogurt, and an apple is huge when the goals remain weight loss and performance. The All Bran option is better.
  7. Corn Pops shouldn’t even exist in your food option, it’s on the dirty thirty worst foods you can eat list.
  8. Eat as fresh as possible. Fresh meat, fresh dairy, fresh produce, fresh everything. Make your own fresh beer if possible. If the fruit or the veggies have some kind of wax coating, choose an alternative. Wax coating is not a good thing.
  9. Snack on celery sticks as often as possible. It’s one of those things that although you’re not really sure of why, you should just do it anyway.
  10. Working out in the morning, right out of bed, with no breakfast, is probably one of the worst thing you can do for yourself. You’ve just spent 6-8 hours not eating, your spine is still fragile, so when you begin to work out, you call upon your muscle (not fat) to do the grinding out. Avoid this. Eat breakfast.
  11. The two most vital and optimal times to eat are breakfast and immediately after a workout.
  12. When you wake up, you may not feel hungry, but that’s because your brain is focusing on the other things at hand. You are hungry, you have to be, and if you held yourself at any other time of the day to 8 hours of not eating you’d be eating this paper right now. Have something to eat. Even left over pizza is better than nothing at all.
  13. The average active person will burn anywhere from 300-500 calories while sleeping. So don’t think that your body is at a complete rest when at rest.
  14. Your body doesn’t care if it uses muscle for energy when in motion. Its purpose is to protect the heart, your brain, and the lungs. And the fat. The fat is what will get the body thru in times of hurricanes, blizzards, and any other world ending disasters.
  15. Veggies have to be hard and hard to get down in order for them to truly be beneficial. Mushy and soft veggies only fill you up. The idea is to fill up and direct the food to the muscle, and not the fat.
  16. After the veggies are steamed, sliced up, or “pealed” in any way, shape, or form, it takes 6 hours for them to lose their powerful kick. The stuff they sell at Trader Joes (the powder “super food” stuff ) that’s supposed to replace your daily intake of real veggies is about 1% as effective.
  17. Strawberries, grapes, blue berries, apples, and oranges all have special and unique qualities about them. They are truly super foods. Although somewhat not very practical, the best solution would be to consume a small portion of each, not individually but in unison 2-4x a day. To get the best bang for your buck.
  18. Water is key. It directly stimulates muscle growth (which is the main ingredient in fat loss) and keeps you regular when processing daily intake of food.
  19. If you are hungry, and have an urge to overeat, the best thing to do is to not overeat. But, if you have too, overeat protein or fat. You’ll feel full after you indulge with chicken or guacamole. If you over eat on carbs, you’ll feel hungry within hours and eat more. Consuming twice the calories you would’ve if you stuck with protein.
  20. Don’t just chow on salad all the time, have something course with it, like some meat, or tofu.

Top 10 Take Away Solutions

  1. Drink 6 bottles of waters a day
  2. Workout 3-5 times per week
  3. Eat 4-5 balanced meals a day
  4. Don’t Skip Breakfast or post workout meals
  5. Cereals I have found that meet the requirements include Uncle Sam Cereal (with added flax; unfortunately it tastes like cardboard), one of the cereals made by Kashi (‘GoLean,’ which tastes the most like sweetened cereal in this list so choose this one if you have a hard time with foods that taste “healthier”), one by Trader Joe’s (‘Hi Fiber Cereal’) and three by Nature’s Path (‘Heritage Flakes,’ ‘FlaxPlus Multigrain’ and ‘8 Grain Flakes’). My personal favorite of all dry cereals in terms of health value and taste is Heritage Flakes.
  6. Add almonds or walnuts to any cereal (hot or cold) for a healthy fat source. The amount of healthy fats in cereals is too low even when almonds or other nuts are in the ingredients (you want around 25% of your total calories per meal to be healthy fats). Also add milk or soy milk as a protein source and fruit such as berries, apple, or a SMALL banana (small for reasons described below). Do not use sweetened soy milk.
  7. If you wake up out of bed and immediately go workout, these are the best bang for your buck in terms of what you can grab on the way to the gym. These options will get something in your stomach, not irritate, and make allow for the workout to help you and not hurt you.
  8. Tips for eating out:

· If ordering a sandwich always ask for extra vegetables

· If eating in a restaurant always order a salad

· If you don’t have time for salad then blend vegetables in your blender drink it

  1. Casing Powder Protein is better than Whey Protein
  2. If you wake up out of bed and immediately go workout, these are the best bang for your buck in terms of what you can grab on the way to the gym. These options will get something in your stomach, not irritate, and make allow for the workout to help you and not hurt you.

a.)    Oatmeal and some fruit. Berries or citrus fruits do best.

b.)    Granola Bars. The ones with less crap in them other than granola the better.

c.)    Ensure drink

d.)   Sliced Bread with some jam or nut butter.

e.)    A liquid meal with 4 parts. One part milk, one pat fruit, one part oats, and one part peanut butter. That’s about 300 calories or so, enough for two sittings.

The real key to all this is MINDSET, you must be ready for the long haul and to really commit to changing your life and perspective on this. Realize that you don’t real know ANYTHING about this topic, even though it’s your own body! Spend some time educating yourself on it, invest in it. People take better care of their car then themselves, trouble is, you can buy a new car, not a new body. I know you like Dancing with the Stars and eating cheesecake, but don’t you like LIVING better?! It can all come down to cost/ benefit.  Just know that you can pay now or later, spend your time wisely and you will get BIG dividends. Even if you  live to 100, do think will live those last 30 well? Well, be proactive and make sure you do. The best time to start training was 10 years ago, next best time, TODAY!  

Stay Strong

Sergio

Is Doing Abs a Waste of Time?

Here is a post by Mike Boyle that says it all. You can see my thoughts at the bottom, but definitely read this post if you want abs, do crunches, have abs or have ever thought about abs.

I can’t even tell you how often I hear someone at the end of
the workout say something like “I need to do more abs, I
want to get a six-pack.”

The truth is that passing on a six-pack is a better way to
get a six-pack than six hundred sit-ups. The key to abdominal
definition is the visibility of the abdominal musculature, not the
strength of the muscles.

You can do one million sit-ups, crunches or whatever
exercise you want and it will have no effect on abdominal
definition.

When people ask me the best exercise for abs I tell them
table push-aways.

It usually takes a few minutes for them to get it. It’s not a
joke, it’s the truth. If you want better abs, eat less and train
more but, don’t just train your abs.

The idea of working abs to get abs is one of the oldest
misconceptions in training. This goes back to the old idea
of spot reduction. Spot reduction has never and will never
work. The research has been done over and over and the
answer is always the same.

You can’t decrease the fat layer on a particular area by
working that area. That means that the guys doing sit-ups to
lose abdominal fat and the lady sitting on the adductor
(inner thigh) machine are both wasting their time.

Good total body work is, was, and always will be the key to
fat loss.

Want better abdominal definition?

Finish every workout with some hard interval training
instead of extra sit-ups or crunches. Interval training or
what is currently called High Intensity Interval Training
(abbreviated HIIT) is the real key to fat loss and the resulting
definition.

Interval training burns more calories than steady state aerobic
training and because it is s sprint program you get a sprinters
body.

Abdominal training may potentially reduce the diameter of
the waistline but, will very little to reduce bodyfat.

The truth is there are lots of good reasons to do abdominal
work or core training as we now like to call it. A strong core
(strong abs) is one of the keys in the prevention of  back pain.
A strong core will help you look better and improve performance
in a host of sports but, sit-ups or any other abdominal exercise
will not reduce bodyfat.  The fact of the matter is that crunches
will lead to back pain long before they lead to visual abs.

Another good tip.

Don’t do crunches. A good abdominal or core program is
a lot more than crunches. Most of your core work should be
isometric exercises like front planks and side planks or carries
like Suitcase carries.
One of the major functions of the core musculature is the
prevention of motion.
W
hat does that mean? It means that the abdominals are
great stabilizers. Work on the stability function, not on
flexion and extension.

Regards,

Mike Boyle
http://www.FunctionalStrengthCoach3.com

Everyone I train wants either  lose abdominal fat or have better definition in their midsection. More and more the I see the answer is nutrition (80%) and then good training (the remaining 20%), to have better definition (which means you have to lean out!).  If you need anymore guidance, as always contact me.

SM

sergiom_personaltrainer@yahoo.com